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Lectio Divina


"Lectio Divina, literally meaning "divine reading," is an ancient practice of praying the Scriptures. During Lectio Divina, the practitioner listens to the text of the Bible with the "ear of the heart," as if he or she is in conversation with God, and God is suggesting the topics for discussion. The method of Lectio Divina includes moments of reading (lectio), reflecting on (meditatio), responding to (oratio) and resting in (contemplatio) the Word of God with the aim of nourishing and deepening one's relationship with the Divine."

From the website: Contemplative Outreach https://www.contemplativeoutreach.org/category/category/lectio-divina


My practice of Lectio Divina is aligned more with the ancient monastic practice rather than the scholastic approach. See below, also from the Contemplative Outreach website:

"The scholastic form was developed in the Middle Ages and divides the process of Lectio Divina into four hierarchical, consecutive steps:  reading, reflecting, responding and resting. The monastic form of Lectio Divina is a more ancient method in which reading, reflecting, responding and resting are experienced as moments rather than steps in a process. In this form, the interaction among the moments is dynamic and the movement through the moments follows the spontaneous prompting of the Holy Spirit. To allow for this spontaneity, Lectio Divina was originally practiced in private."

My intent in publishing my thoughts through the Waystead Watch blog, is to share my moments of reflection without attachment to any particular purpose. It's always been my habit to write down my reflections, and part of the 'response' moment in my practice of Lectio Divina took the form of an inner prompt to share them with others.

So here we are.

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